Triangle Continuation Patterns in Technical Analysis

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In this guide to understanding Triangle Continuation Patterns, we’ll show you what this indicator looks like, teach you how to interpret it, and explain variants on the pattern.

What Is the Triangle Continuation Pattern?

The Triangle is a continuation pattern using the concepts of support and resistance and price breakouts.

Generally, when prices make significant moves, they go through a period of resting.

Usually with a Triangle pattern, the price consolidation period consists of higher lows and lower lows, forming the shape of a “triangle”.

What Does the Triangle Continuation Pattern Look Like?

Chart 1 below of Amazon.com (AMZN) shows the Triangle continuation pattern:

Chart 1: triangle continuation pattern
Chart 1
Please note, this is an example trade – not a recommendation.

How to Interpret the Triangle Continuation Pattern

When the support and resistance lines begin converging, price can burst out of the consolidation area and it is expected that the price action will continue trending in the direction that prices have been moving previously.

Triangle Breakout Potential Buy Signal

A potential signal to buy is given when the resistance line is penetrated to the upside. The signal is generally expected to be stronger if prices have been in an uptrend prior to the upside breakout.

Triangle Breakout Potential Sell Signal

A possible sell signal occurs when the support line is penetrated to the downside. Usually the sell signal is considered stronger if prices have been in a downtrend prior to the downside breakout.

Variants on the Pattern

Two closely related variants of the Triangle pattern are the Ascending and Descending Triangle pattern.

These two patterns are shown in Chart 2 below using 100 ounce Gold futures as an example:

Chart 2: ascending and descending triangle breakout chart patterns
Chart 2
Please note, this is an example trade – not a recommendation.

Ascending Triangle

An Ascending Triangle is viewed as being more bullish than the regular Triangle patterns. With an Ascending Triangle, higher lows are being made (typically a bullish sign) and sometimes higher highs are being made (also typically a bullish sign).

Ascending Triangle Potential Buy Signal

As with the regular Triangle formation, the Ascending Triangle potentially gives a buy signal when the resistance line is penetrated to the upside. Also, the signal is considered to be stronger if prices have been in an uptrend prior to the Ascending Triangle and upside breakout.

Descending Triangle

The Descending Triangle is viewed as being more bearish than the regular Triangle patterns. When a Descending Triangle is formed, lower lows are being made (typically a bearish sign) and quite often, lower highs are being made (generally seen as bearish).

Descending Triangle Potential Sell Signal

With the Descending Triangle formation, a possible sell signal occurs when the support line is penetrated to the downside.

Traders usually view the sell signal as being stronger if prices have been in a confirmed downtrend prior to the Descending Triangle formation and downside breakout.

A similar chart formation is the Flag pattern.

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Further Reading

Learn more about technical analysis indicators, concepts, and strategies including:

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